‘Nice to meet you!’ Revealing community gems through photography

Inspired by the popular series Humans of New York, we organized a workshop where participants document a library scene or subject and have the choice of conducting a short interview with their subject or writing a description of the scene. You can view the presentation here and the handout here.

One of our most popular classes, we had students ranging from complete novices to more practiced photographers. One of our participants runs a section on her blog Jittery Cook called Jittery Jabber where she posted her photos and interviews of the day. While some of the shorter work by other participants were uploaded to Twitter and can be viewed here. One of our participants conducted longer interviews and both her experience and photos are posted below.

Of her experience Marcia said

For me, an unexpected benefit of the photo workshop was that my vision (inwardly speaking) improved as I […] shot pictures fully knowing why I was reaching for this one and not for that one…..
Thanks to you for your good work!

The question that I had in mind is: What Are You Doing on This First Beautiful Weekend in Montreal in 2015

I found seven people who allowed me to get their photo and talk with them and five who would not….

  • Amita at the Atwater Library told me, ’I go to the library mainly to borrow books and read the newspapers to find out what’s going on in the world…food for the soul.’ Often she visits the library in Brossard close to her home.

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  • Mitchel is the Atwater Library gardener who told me “I just moved from one part of Montreal to Mile End in a student house with five others, a brand new whole house.” Clearly he loves his new home and will be moving in all weekend, unpacking.

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  • Maureen was “on her way to the Jazz Festival with a friend who reached out to her on this Friday because she lost her husband three weeks ago.” She said she felt “If someone reaches out, the least she can do is reach back.”

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  • I found the four members of a family on the corner of Atwater and St-Catherine this sunny Friday in Montreal waiting for a walk signal. One daughter in a two tone hijab and blue dress would not stand for the photo with her sister Naira and brother Anas, but she was radiant as her mother Qaisai said she is out enjoying her three children. Usually she’s cooking, cleaning, and shopping or going to work in a sewing factory. Naira “works for a federal public service in Ottawa and comes to Montreal every two weeks to visit.” Anas was just “taking a break from cleaning” and seemed glad to be out and about with his kin.

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  • Evelyne and Toto were on the corner of St-Catherine and the east corner of the park being renovated;   she said she will take her two boys to play in Westmount Park” but they haven’t been to the Jazz Festival at all.

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  • David received my introduction saying, “Enchante” and explained in English he was waiting for a friend “to walk the La Chine Canal.” He does free lance writing for papers such as La Press, but was born on the south shore and hasn’t been to the Jazz Festival this year because of “all the road blocks and construction on the bridges and streets this year.”

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  • Finn and Gordon, who are part of the Humans in New York workshop are “Doing something that’s a surprise for Finn’s brother’s 11th birthday and Finn is excited to find out what the surprise is all about. She’s 14 and goes to Royal West. He’s retired and was looking after his mom and dad (90 and 95) till his mom recently passed away. “We’re going to visit our other grandmother on July 5th in Ottawa,” Finn told me.

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Zine Making: Accessible Expression

Popularly know as a DIY way to self publish writing and art. Zines are created by people interested in political issuespunk culture, or even cult TV shows, and movies. Zines are a way to share thoughts to your community and beyond. We used the medium to create miniature E-Books. People were inspired to create books of poetry, cookbooks, and photo experimentations.

The first class focused on photoshop (handout here), showing students how to edit stock photos to create something completely new. On the second class we introduced the website BeFunky. A free photo editing site where people were able to play with, and edit their photos quickly and easily. The ones below were made by Susan who said “[she] had always wanted to make greeting cards”.

Check out some other cool zines at the bottom of this post!

AnimalsYourTreeorMineFinch AnimalsFeelingJumpy

Other community work:

AmiSlide1 Slide2hot teas       WolfPP2

 

 

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What I Want To Do, And What I Need To, Aren’t Always Separate Entities

My experience at the Atwater Library has been completely undefinable. I struggle to put into words how much the experience has meant to me, and the amazing time that I have had working here over the past six weeks. I have learnt something new everyday and I have spent it doing what I love.

I am a big believer that anyone can learn how to use technology. Most people already have some of the necessary skills without realizing it. We are working to give everyone the same tools, and by doing so help bridging the technological divide. However, everyone has something to learn, and technology moves at such a breathtaking speed that there is no one who can say that they don’t have anything left to learn.

I had the opportunity to speak on CBC to promote the Creative Digital Media Workshop Series. While on air I spoke about the importance of Digital Citizenship, and how, just like in the real world, we have to teach people how to properly conduct themselves online. The importance of online communities is undeniable. In a society that is putting more and more of their personal thoughts and lives on the internet it is necessary to teach how to respect the person on the other side of the screen. We can form connections in a millisecond, forming relationships with people across the world, but we have to remember that there are people on the other side of the computer. Not just binaries.

One of the ways to do this is to teach Digital Citizenship. For every workshop we had over the past few weeks we opened the dialogue for ethical photo taking and sharing. By creating a fun medium to explore these topics in we were able to open the discussion in a way that everyone was comfortable exploring.

Not only is the ethical side of Digital Literacy important but so are the sheer amount of possibilities available to those who use computers. Creatively they can suit almost anyone’s tastes. Allowing for development in projects that focus on poetry, photography and video, music, art, and literature anyone is able to spice up their work in a few hours. Digital art is often forgiving enough that beginners are also comfortable with making mistakes and trying new things.

Through Digital Citizenship we are working to build confidence, both online and off, and digitally is a great place to do so—There are many online communities that foster positivity and kindness.

We have had a diverse amount of people who showed up to all our workshops.  We had people who were comfortable using their computers and cameras, and people who had never touched one in their lives. From children to seniors, everyone explored different forms of expressing themselves!

Leaving after six weeks, I can’t help but relate my experience to my present self as an Honours English and Creative Student; as well as my future self, the author and Professor I aspire to be. There are very few jobs at my current level that could give me the experience I need for furthering my education and my future career. I want to spend my life doing what I love and the only way I can do that is by practicing, and building my practical knowledge. The Atwater Library has given me that opportunity. Rather then committing myself to a career path I didn’t know for certain I would enjoy, I can commit myself to it knowing that I will love it. Interning at the library has shown me how much can be accomplished by hard work, and how rewarding it is to teach someone something new. Just like in the workshops where our goal was to learn skills that can be applied in daily life or to future projects, I have learnt skills that I will be able to use for myself!

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2014 Rewind

2014 was a great year for the Digital Literacy Project. We made many new partners and expanded our programs in new and interesting ways.

Here are some of the highlights:

We worked with Gerald McShane Elementary School in Montreal North to help them explore four different learning styles (visual, auditory, tactile and kinesthetic) through digital media such as video, PowerPoint and animation.

In early January we conducted a workshop for the clients of the Tyndale St-Georges Little Burgundy Employment Centre about social media, internet privacy and how to build a positive online identity.

With funding from the federal government’s New Horizons for Seniors program, we offered a series of workshops aimed at empowering musically-oriented seniors to use computers and later teach others to use computers to record and create music. The workshops were facilitated by Eric Craven and Peter Shaw, a student in theatre at Concordia University, with the collaboration of Line Grenier, a professor in Communication studies at Université de Montréal.

The participants impressed us with a wide range of musical expression that was inspiring and challenging. You can hear some of the work that was made  their Soundcloud page Alt-Together. as well as video featuring one of the projects called “Fried Brains”.

Through our connection with ACT (Ageing + Communications + Technologies) Eric Craven and Dr. Line Grenier had the opportunity to co-present a paper about the project at the European Communication Research and Education Association Conference (ECREA) in Lisbon in November 2014 as part of a panel called “New Media and Older People – Age, Narratives and Normativities.”
Check out the trailer and another video we made for this presentation.

While in Portugal,  Eric Craven  also  gave a talk entitled “Digital Culture and Community” at the Madeira Interactive Technologies Institute (Madeira-ITI).

For most of the year, we worked with youth from diverse backgrounds to make videos about pluralism. At certain points of the year, this was hot button issue due to the public debate about the proposed Charter of Values. For this project, we collaborated with Trisha Islam and Rana Salah to connect with youth in the community. We held talks, screenings, and workshops at the Library and around the city. In the end, we made over 30 videos. You can check them out on our pluralism video site.

We worked with  Bienvenue à Notre-Dame-de-Grâce to offer digital skills development related to community event planning. There were 2 sessions, one in English and one in French, participants came to the Library once a week for 10 weeks. We covered general computer skills, elements of graphic design and social media marketing.

We collaborated with visual artist Romeo Gongora’s project Just Watch Me at Concordia University’s Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery.  Digital Literacy Project facilitators Rana Salah and Nina Pariser did three poetry and digital media workshops and also screened videos from our recent Youth Pluralism Video Project

On September 21, 2014, we set up at Empire Exchange in Montreal’s Mile End neighbourhood and did a green video workshop as part of the POP Montreal International Music Festival’s Kids POP Crawl. Check out what the kids did.

We partnered Concordia University’s Theatre and Development program for the third time in three years. Students in a course called “The Neighbourhood Theatre” connected with two graduate studies seminars from different disciplines under the name “The Right to the City: Cross-disciplinary pedagogy and the politics of Montreal’s South-West.”  We  supported this initiative by connecting the students to our partners and helping them create an online “digital reflection” of the experience through social media, video and photography. On November 29, 2014, the students showed their work to the public in Pointe Saint-Charles. See the student’s work on The Right to the City website.  Earlier in the year, Concordia University made a video our  previous collaboration for their Spotlight on Community Engagement series.

 

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Digital Literacy Project @ Kids POP 2014 – Green Screen Fun

On Sunday September 21, we set up at Empire Exchange in Montreal’s Mile End neighbourhood and did a green video workshop as part of the POP Montreal International Music Festival’s Kids POP Crawl.

Check out the what the kids did.

 

 

 

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